Catch Up Lecture

We will not have MATH6055 class next Friday, 09:00, 25 October.

I would like to catch up on this after the reading break. Please click here and fill out your preference between the times. I know ye are all free at this times and it is just a case of picking the most popular time.

Week 6

We finished Chapter 2 with a Concept MCQ on Functions Theory, and moved onto Algebra.

Week 7

In Week 7 we started delving more into algebra and started talking about equations.

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Concept MCQ

Before 11:00 Wednesday 23 October please, on your own, complete the following (click link). It is just six MCQ Questions.

Friday 25 October

No MATH7019 classes this coming Friday: we have already caught up with these classes in Week 5.

Assessment 1 – Results

I hope to have these with you at some stage this weekend.

Assessment 2

Assessment 2 is on p.137. It has a hand in date of Monday 18 November, Week 10, and you can already do all the questions. That gives you a month: no harm getting it done before the deadline.

Week 6

We finished looking at fixed end beams and then we looked at cantilevers.

We started looking at Euler’s Method. We had no Monday tutorial.

Week 7

In Week 7 we will look at the Three Term Taylor Method and begin Chapter 3 on Probability and Statistics. We should be able to have a tutorial on Monday.

Reading Week

Use this time wisely. There is nothing (perhaps other CA work) stopping you working on Assignment 2.

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Test 1

As I said in Tuesday’s lecture, I was a little concerned to see so many people still writing when time was up.

I said that the test is normally 55 rather than 50 minutes long (due to restrictions placed on me by the Exams Office (that I subsequently saw were unnecessary)), but that I had thought I had adjusted the test appropriately.

There are two main reasons why people might have been still writing with time up:

  • people, primarily due to missing too many classes, were not prepared properly, and/or
  • the test was too long

I can apologise unreservedly if it was the case that the test was too long.

How I can I fix this?

First of all, for the second test I will give ye the full hour rather than 55 minutes.

The second thing I will do is look back on last year’s results for Test 1 and look at the average of those:

  • with zero attendance warnings
  • with one attendance warnings
  • with two attendance warnings
  • with three attendance warnings

If these differ significantly from this year’s averages, I will adjust upwards the marks appropriately.

If I don’t see a significant difference I am going to put the fact that people were still writing with no time left as primarily down to them not having prepared properly for the test.

Week 6

We had the test on Monday and this meant we could not start a review of differentiation. On Tuesday we looked at Cramer’s Rule, and then on Thursday we did one more question followed by a Concept MCQ on Matrices.

I actually have videos from last year if you missed some classes from Week 6:

Week 7

We will start Chapter 3 with a review of differentiation followed by a look at Parametric Differentiation.

If you want to look ahead here are two videos:

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Test 1

Test 1, worth 15% of your final grade, will take place in the usual D160 lecture venue at 10:00 on Tuesday 15 October. 

You can find a sample here.

Test 1 will cover the contents of Chapter 1 and the sample will give an idea of the layout and length of the test.

The following types of questions are examinable:

  • P.22, Q. 1, 3, 4, 6-7, 9, 13-14
  • P.28, Q. 1-4
  • P.32, Q. 2
  • P. 37, Q.1-3

Questions like those exercises not listed here will not appear on your exam paper but are still useful to help your learning and understanding. For example, working with truth tables should help your understanding of the Laws of Sets.

Any questions at all, you can email me, perhaps with a screenshot of your attempt.

You will want to be familiar with all the concepts in the Chapter Summary, P. 38.

Transposition Project

On Monday you will be sent a 20 minute quiz that you will take on a mobile internet device — such as your mobile phone — during Monday’s lecture. You will have another quiz again after we finish studying algebra.

These quizzes do not affect your MATH6055 grade but are part of a larger project the Mathematics Department is undertaking in an effort to improve our teaching.

If you do not have an internet ready device you may leave class early.

Week 5

In Week 5 we continued our study of functions and their properties. We considered the composition of functions — and inverse functions.

Week 6

We should finish Chapter 2 and move onto Algebra.

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Assessment 1

Three things must be submitted:

  • a soft,digital, copy of your Excel file MATH7019A1 – Your Name
  • a hard copy of your Excel file MATH7019A1 – Your Name
  • your written work

Email the soft copy to me.

Combine the second two elements into one report. Ideally the Excel work for Problem A near the written work for Problem A, etc. If this isn’t easy, maybe just put all the written work at the front, and all the Excel work at the back.

The assignment can be handed up during tutorial:

  • Today, 16:00-18:00 in B228, or
  • Tomorrow, 11:00-12:00 (A243L) or 12:00-13:00 (A213B)

Otherwise drop the assessment to my office A283. I will be here, tomorrow, Friday 11 October, until 17:30 sharp (which is the deadline).

Work assigned late will be awarded a mark of zero. Hand up what you have on time.

Week 5

We had an extra tutorial on Monday.

We then looked at more examples of simply supported beams before moving onto fixed-end beams.

Week 6

We will finish looking at fixed end beams before looking at cantilevers.

We will not have a tutorial on Monday.

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Test 1

Test 1, worth 15%, takes place from 16:00 to 16:50 sharp, Monday 14 October in the Melbourne Hall (rows I-K). I will have emailed your 15:00-16:00 lecturers so that they will leave you plenty of time to get to the Melbourne.

There is a sample on P.46 of the notes to give you an idea of the length and layout only.

Almost everything in Chapter 1 is examinable. Additional practise questions may be found by looking at past exam papers (usually vectors are Q. 1, sometimes Q. 2).

You will want to be familiar with all the concepts in the Vector Summary, P. 42-45.

You can check your work against the Sample Test Marking Scheme.

Any questions at all, you can email me, perhaps with a screenshot of your attempt. There are also a number of you in the Telegram group which has thus far been silent.

HINT (very rare): Look at “Vector of a Given Magnitude in a Given Direction” on p.15-16. Thus, also, Example 3 Winter 2017 on p.37-38, Example 4 Summer 2016 on p.38, and Autumn 2018 on p.39-40.

Week 5

We look at Matrix Inverses — “dividing” for Matrices. This allowed us to solve matrix equations. We looked at linear systems, and determinants.

Week 6

We will finish looking at Chapter 2 and then we will start Chapter 3 with a review of differentiation followed, perhaps, by a look at Parametric Differentiation.

Read the rest of this entry »

Test 1

Test 1, worth 15% of your final grade, will take place in the usual D160 lecture venue at 10:00 on Tuesday 15 October. 

You can find a sample here.

Test 1 will cover the contents of Chapter 1 and the sample will give an idea of the layout and length of the test.

The following types of questions are examinable:

  • P.22, Q. 1, 3, 4, 6-7, 9, 13-14
  • P.28, Q. 1-4
  • P.32, Q. 2
  • P. 37, Q.1-3

Questions like those exercises not listed here will not appear on your exam paper but are still useful to help your learning and understanding. For example, working with truth tables should help your understanding of the Laws of Sets.

Week 4

We finished Chapter 1 by looking more at relations and their properties. We started our study of Chapter 2: Functions Theory. A function is a special type of relation.

Week 5

In Week 5 we will continue our study of functions and their properties.

Read the rest of this entry »

I am emailing a link of this to everyone on the class list every week. If you are not receiving these emails or want to have them sent to another email address feel free to email me at jpmccarthymaths@gmail.com and I will add you to the mailing list.

Assessment 1

Assessment 1 has been emailed to all of you.

Start ASAP.

The hand in date is next Friday 11 October 2019. I am happy so say that I can push the deadline out to 17:30 on FridayIf you don’t want to hand up your assignment in the Friday tutorial (or a class earlier that week), you can drop that afternoon to my office, A283.

Tutorials

The “your choice” split is working well and will continue.

We will also have an additional tutorial this coming Monday.

Tutorials are the most important thing in your learning.

 

Week 4

We did not have a tutorial on Monday, but instead ploughed into chapter two: we will hopefully start looking in particular at simply supported beams.

We also had a Concept MCQ on Chapter One on Thursday.

Week 5

We will have an extra tutorial on Monday. We will then look at more examples of simply supported beams before moving onto fixed-end beams.

Read the rest of this entry »

Your timetable is wrong in the naming of this module. MATH6040 is Technological Maths 201 and not Technological Maths 2. You did Technological Maths 2: MATH6015, last year.

Test 1

Test 1, worth 15%, takes place from 16:00 to 16:50 sharp, Monday 14 October in the Melbourne Hall (rows I-K). I have emailed your 15:00-16:00 lecturers so that they will leave you plenty of time to get to the Melbourne.

There is a sample on P.46 of the notes to give you an idea of the length and layout only.

Almost everything in Chapter 1 is examinable. Additional practise questions may be found by looking at past exam papers (usually vectors are Q. 1, sometimes Q. 2).

You will want to be familiar with all the concepts in the Vector Summary, P. 42-45.

Week 4

We finished looking at the applications of vectors to work and moments and began Chapter 2: Matrices. We did some examples of matrix arithmetic. Here find a note that answers the question: why do we multiply matrices like we do?

We also did a Concept MCQ to summarise Chapter 1.

Week 5

We will look at Matrix Inverses — “dividing” for Matrices. This will allow us to solve matrix equations. We will look at linear systems, and possibly determinants.

Read the rest of this entry »

I am emailing a link of this to everyone on the class list every week. If you are not receiving these emails or want to have them sent to another email address feel free to email me at jpmccarthymaths@gmail.com and I will add you to the mailing list.

Test 1

Test 1, worth 15% of your final grade, will take place in the usual D160 lecture venue at 10:00 on Tuesday 15 October. 

You can find a sample here. I will give ye a copy of this next week.

Test 1 will cover the contents of Chapter 1 and the sample will give an idea of the layout and length of the test.

The following types of questions are examinable:

  • P.22, Q. 1, 3, 4, 6-7, 9, 13-14
  • P.28, Q. 1-4
  • P.32, Q. 2
  • P. 37, Q.1-3

Questions like those exercises not listed here will not appear on your exam paper but are still useful to help your learning and understanding. For example, working with truth tables should help your understanding of the Laws of Sets.

Set Identities

As briefly discussed on Friday, we are going to ask these questions with sets called P and Q rather than A and B. I have copies of this for ye.

After the tutorial, I will send on the solutions, and might possibly send on a video also.

Telegram App

For those who have already contacted me, I hope to have this set up for Monday.

If this is something you might be interested in, please download the Telegram app and set yourself up with an @ handle.

Week 3

We looked at the Laws of Sets and moved onto Cartesian Products and Relations.

Week 4

In Week 4 we will finish Chapter 1 by looking more at relations and their properties. We will start our study of Chapter 2: Functions. A function is a special type of relation.

Read the rest of this entry »

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